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The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Day 763: Ukraine at War

Publication: Ukraine Liveblogs
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The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Ukraine's Negotiator for Savchenko's Release Says Russians Want Trade Corridor to Crimea in Exchange

Novaya Gazeta's special correspondent Pavel Kanygin published this evening an interview with the Ukrainian Security Service (SBU) official Yury Tandit, the chief negotiator with Russia for a possible exchange involving the release of imprisoned Ukrainian pilot Nadiya Savchenko.

There's a lot in this lengthy interview but here are a few key points: 

Translation: in exchange for Savchenko, the RF authorities want a trade corridor to Crimea, Tandit, negotiator on behalf of SBU told special correspondent Kanygin.

Tandit is trying to get the release of 128 remaining Ukrainian prisoners who are in the custody of either Russia or the Russian-backed separatists --  79 armed military personnel and 49 civilians including activists and journalists; among them is film-maker Oleg Sentsov.

The SBU officer rejected the idea of a trade of the GRU agents for Savchenko because he said, "We know Russia wants more" (translation by The Interpreter):

"They are interested, for example, in a corridor from Rostov to Crimea. I was openly told this by that very person close to the Kremlin. I said that we were interested in the question of the release of all the hostages. To which they answered" [here he speaks with an accent--PK], "Well, then we need you to meet us half-way. We need a stable connection to the Crimea, so that freight can be hauled there, and passengers." I said to him that only in the East could a princess be traded for a half-kingdom. And that the issue cannot be put this way. The entire world community has spoken out for Nadiya. And we are prepared for any compromises."

-- Catherine A. Fitzpatrick 


The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Reading Of Savchenko Verdict Will Continue Tomorrow

The reading of the verdict in the trial of Nadiya Savchenko has ended for the day and will continue tomorrow.

Defense lawyer Nikolai Polozov tweeted:

Translation: The judge has declared a recess until tomorrow. The reading of the verdict will continue at 10 am.

-- Pierre Vaux

The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Rada Human Rights Committee Condemns Disruption Of Lviv LGBT Festival

The Ukrainian parliament's human rights committee has condemned the harassment of activists in Lviv which saw an LGBT festival cancelled after protests and harassment by far-right groups.

Today the Verkhovna Rada Committee on human rights, national minorities and inter-ethnic relations expressed "deep concern" and condemned the disruption of the festival.

The Committee stated that such behaviour was unacceptable in a democratic state that advocated European values and that those who violated the law must be held accountable. 

Within the scope of our own authority, we demand a transparent and prompt investigation into the events. The European integration of Ukraine is inseparably linked to a tolerant and inclusive society, and also respect for people regardless of the color of their skin, origin, disability, language, sexual orientation or gender identity and other attributes.

The Committee once again reiterates its commitment to the rule of law and respect for minorities.


-- Pierre Vaux
The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Verdict In Savchenko Trial May Not Come Today
Many non-Russians (and Russians, alike) are frustrated with this aspect of the Russian court system, but verdicts in Russian courts are often very large documents, read in their entirety. The result is a frustrating one, both for the press and the outside world, and of course for the defendants and others involved with the case.
-- James Miller
The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
An Overview of Nadiya Savchenko And the Case Against Her

For readers who are just tuning in, the sentencing hearing for Nadiya Savchenko has begun. Savchenko is a Ukrainian military pilot, MP, and a member of the Parliamentary Council of Europe, but she is perhaps best known for what is happening to her, as she is accused of the murder of two Russian journalists in eastern Ukraine.

A crime she almost certainly did not commit.

Savchenko is widely regarded as a political prisoner at best, a hostage at worst. In the end she is a soldier who was kidnapped to another country to stand trial for a crime, that probably is not a crime, just to settle a geopolitical score.

We have written a complete overview of the Savchenko case here, a concise look at who Savchenko is and what this trial is all about: Read it here.  

-- James Miller
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