And finally, you can view your Pressimus profile by clicking on your profile image, and selecting your profile, and you can customize your Pressimus settings by selecting settings.
Watch quick explainer video
Finish
X

Request Invitation




Submit
Close
Submit
Stream by
The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Russia Update: January 22, 2015

Publication: Russia Update
Readability View
Press View
Show oldest first
The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Lithuania Creates New Manual For Its Citizens: How To Survive a Russian Invasion

Russia's actions in Ukraine obviously have many of Russia's neighbors frightened since Russia was responding to the internal politics of a sovereign nation with brute force. But what is less obvious, because it attracted fewer headlines, is that Russia's interference in Ukraine started long before "little green men" took over Crimea, and Ukraine is not the only country where Russia is engaged in this behavior.

In the summer of 2013, Russia waged trade wars against several neighbors, including Ukraine, in order to bully them away from joining the European Union. In the last year Russia has infiltrated or tested the territorial boundaries of European nations by air, sea, and land. In August, in a military-style operation, Russian agents crossed Estonia's border and kidnapped a counter-intelligence agent, dragging him across the border into Russia where he is now facing espionage charges.

How serious are Russia's neighbors taking this threat? Well, Lithuania has created a new manual for its citizens to prepare them to resist a Russian invasion. The Atlantic reports:

The 98-page guide, which this week goes out to libraries and army personnel in the 3-million-strong Baltic nation, is meant to gird citizens for the possibility of invasion, occupation, and armed conflict. The manual, entitled "How to Act in Extreme Situations or Instances of War," may seem an overly anxious measure in a country like Lithuania, which lived under Soviet control from 1940 to 1991 but has enjoyed the security of European Union and NATO membership since 2004...

"When Russia started its aggression in Ukraine, our citizens here in Lithuania understood that our neighbor is not friendly," said Lithuanian Defense Minister Juozas Olekas in an interview with Reuters.

The examples of Georgia and Ukraine—which have both lost parts of their territory in wars with Russia or pro-Russian separatists—"show us that we cannot rule out a similar kind of situation here," added Olekas, who noted in the manual's introduction that he had received "frequent questions about our homeland defense from ordinary Lithuanian citizens."

The manual instructs citizens on how to prepare bomb shelters, and even suggests that if the Russian army occupies their town then they should consider "doing your job worse than usual" as a measure of passive resistance.

Read about the manual here.

-- James Miller

The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
OSCE Freedom of Media Representative Condemns Conviction of Russian Journalist for 'Insult' of Officials
The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Putin Crony Sechin's Young Son Honored for "Long-standing Service
The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
St. Petersburg Art Salon Cancels Novitsky Concert for Political Reasons

Novitsky planned a memorial concert in honor of Vladimir Vysotsky, a popular folk singer who died in 1980.

The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Merkel Says 'No Reason' to Lift Sanctions on Russia

Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel says that sanctions on Russia are "inevitable," but they are not "an end in itself," today at the Davos economic reform, the Ukrainian news site 24 Today reported.

But she sees no reason to lift them now over Russia's war against Ukraine.

 The Irish Times reports on Merkel's speech, citing Reuters, as did Moscow Times:

“The annexation of Crimea is not just any annexation,” she said at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

“It is a violation of the values that created a peaceful order in Europe after World War Two, namely the acceptance of borders and respect of territorial integrity.

“Economic sanctions were unavoidable. They are not an end in themselves. They can be lifted if the reasons why they were introduced are removed. But unfortunately we are not there yet.” 

-- Catherine A. Fitzpatrick


X

Acknowledgements