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Published in Stream:
Ukraine Liveblog Day 161
Press by
The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Russia's Next Crisis: A Brain Drain?
6 years
Russian Economy Takes a Major Hit
Rebel Leaders In Disarray As Ukraine's Military Advances
Today The Interpreter's Andrew Bowen published in The National Interest on why the Ukraine crisis is just one of the problems that Russia is now facing.

Increasingly there have been examples of Russia's best and brightest emigrating, from the respected economist Sergei Guriev to Russian facebook founder Pavel Durov. Emigration figures have jumped to 186,382 in 2013 from 33,578 in 2010. Yet, the numbers belie the more troubling trend as those figures are not just political refugees and cannot simply replaced by more immigrants from Central Asia, those figures include the entrepreneurs and bright minds of Russia. Minds that an increasingly isolated Russia can ill afford to lose.

"That is why today's émigrés are all the more important-they have higher educations and are the engines of innovation and growth that Russia can ill afford to lose as it is increasingly isolated from the rest of the World.

And without people like these, Putin's Stalin-like "four-year production plan" to boost labor productivity and ignite a "technological revolution" that will serve to energize the economy are more than likely to fall short. This-combined with his calls for further support of the arms industry to produce more "high-end jobs"-is not encouraging for the diversification of the Russian economy."

You can read the full article here.