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Published in Stream:
Day 714: February 1, 2016
Press by
The Interpreter
@Interpreter_Mag
Russian-to-English translation journal, with original analysis and commentary on Russia's foreign & domestic policy.
Interpreter_Mag
Savchenko Reveals Sensational News at Trial: One of Her Kidnappers was Pavel Karpov, Aide to Kremlin's Surkov
6 years
Attacks Reported Across Front Line
Ukraine, Russia, Sanctions, And The Fate Of The Donbass In The Balance

In a sensational development at her trial today, captured Ukrainian pilot Nadiya Savchenko revealed that she had identified one of her kidnappers as Pavel Karpov, at one time an aide to Kremlin "grey cardinal" Vladislav Surkov, who has been a key figure in the war in Ukraine. Surkov recently met with Secretary of State Victoria Nuland to discuss the Minsk agreement.


Savchenko's Ukrainian attorney was able to obtain intercepts of conversations between Pavel and Valery Bolotov, the first leader of the self-declared "Lugansky People's Republic" who was said by the Ukrainian Security Service (SBU) to coordinate with Russian intelligence in the invasion of the Donbass.

The follow is a translation by The Interpreter of the relevant tweets about Karpov's involvement. Nikolai Polozov, Savchenko's attorney, live-tweeted her testimony from the trial:

Translation: I was driven to Lugansk for about 20 minutes. At 10:35 they left, and at 11:00 I was already chained in handcuffs in the gymnasium of the draft board.

Translation: when I was driven, I was blindfolded, and heard how other captives were brought in. After that, Plotnitsky interrogated me.

The blindfold was evidently removed when Plotnitsky interrogated her. 

Translation: While I was captive, the fighters Karyakin, Gromov, and Plotnitsky kept saying they would take me to Russia.
Translation: when I ended up captive, they didn't find one of my telephones. Only at 11:02, 11:03, 11:04 there were phone calls from my sister.
Translation: One of the telephones on which there was a photo of the separatists, "strolled" around Lugansk after it was stolen from me, and only later was given to the Investigative Committee.
Translation: Nadezhda is describing the events of June 23, when she was taken to the Russian Federation.
Translation: Two cars came, one was apparently a Niva, Plotnitsky came up to the driver of one of the cars and gave him a package with my telephone and documents.
Translation: The driver of that car was heavyset, with a short haircut and beard, well-equipped, with a high-class bullet-proof vest and a machine gun.
Translation: I was surprised that Plotnitsky talked with this heavyset driver as if with a boss. He gave him my documents and telephone.
Translation: I was put in a car where there were still fighters. They drove breaking traffic laws into oncoming traffic and raced toward Donetsk.

Translation: We drove about 40 minutes, and turned left at the crossroads at Krasny Luch. The speed was about 80-100/km/hour.

Here Savchenko is blindfolded again: 

Translation: We stopped at some sort of coal mines, I was transferred from the 4x4 to the Niva, and I was blindfolded. We drove another 15  minutes.
Translation: The driver of the Niva (with whom Plotnitsky  had talked) said we could not drive further, there were trenches. He did not understand the Ukrainian language.
Translation: The man whom Nadezhda recognized was Pavel Karpov. He was an aide to Surkov, he previously worked in the presidential administration.
Translation: Further details about the activity of Pavel Karpov in the Donbass can be read here: http://realgazeta.com.ua/chelovek-surkova-v-lnr/ ("Surkov's Man in the Lugansk People's Republic")
Translation: Pavel Nikolayevich Karpov, aide to Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov's, a former official of the Russian Federation presidential administration, is one of Savchenko's kidnappers.
Translation: The defense has information that on July 18 [2015], Pavel Karpov discussed Savchenko on the telephone with Bolotov as "the woman sniper."
Translation: Fantastically and unexpectedly, the suspects of both my and @mark_feygin's criminal cases are intertwined!
Translation: Wow, the court attached a photograph of Pavel Karpov to the materials of the case. Today is a show of unheard of generosity!
Translation: The defenses possesses a tape of telephone conversations regarding Savchenko between Pavel Karpov and Valery Bolotov.
Translation: The intercept was obtained through an attorney's request by Savchenko's Ukrainian lawyer A. Plakhotniuk from the criminal case about her kidnapping.

Translation: The fingerprints of Vladislav Yuryevich [Surkov] (and his patron) are all over many criminal cases. That's how it turned out.

The reference is to the cases involving an ultranationalist group BORN [Battle Organization of Russian Nationalists], accused of multiple murders, the main suspect of which, Ivan Goryachev, was defended by Feygin.

Translation: In the defense's petition, the full text of the talks between Bolotov and Karpov was cited.
Translation: The prosecutors are objecting to the attachment [of the petition about Karpov]. The defense is talking about asking not to attach it, but announcing the call of witnesses.
Translation: The judge refused to call Karpov and Bolotov as witnesses in the case.
Translation: The conversations of Kolomiyets and Manshin, Bolotov and Karpov were taped by the SBU and are evidence in the criminal case about the kidnapping of Savchenko.
Translation: Despite all the evidence submitted by Savchenko's defense, she will be convicted. An exonerating sentence would be a catastrophe for the Kremlin.

Translation: One of the BORN curators from the presidential administration was actually Pavel Karpov. This same person drove Nadezhda Savchenko from Lugansk to Russia.

"Curator" is a Russian intelligence term meaning case or agent manager.

Note: Pavel Nikolayevich Karpov, referenced here, is not the same person as the former investigator now on the Magnitsky List; his patronymic is "Aleksandrovich".

-- Catherine A. Fitzpatrick