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Final Wish
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Removed From My Wishes, But Never From My Heart.

March 4th 2017.

Today I am writing about a recent experience I had on Final Wish. As most of you already know an important part of Final Wish is to decide who you want to care for your Pets.

In 2016 a year I will always remember as the year we lost many celebrities. I also lost my best friend Carrie and my cat Dooby. It is a year I will never forget and a reminder that life is short.

My wife and I never had children...we had Dooby. He became like a child to us and we spoiled him rotten.

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Dooby!
2017-03-14 00:46:09

We had Dooby for 14 amazing years and as you can see from his picture above he was a very cool cat. Dooby was very sick and starting to show his age in December and we had to make the decision that it was time to let him go. It was the best thing for him, as he was starting to suffer.

I can't describe the emotions we went through, but it was like nothing I have experienced before. You are around your pets all the time and they become extremely close. Anyone who has gone through this loss knows exactly what I mean. We spent his last night spoiling him with treats and doing all the things he loved to do and when the time came to end his suffering he told us he was ready to go.

It was peaceful and he was surrounded by his favourite things (his lemon toy and his blanket) and most importantly the people he loved.

It has been almost three months now and I still think about Dooby several times a day. Recently my wife and I planned a vacation and will be traveling to Mexico.

Whenever I take a trip I like to go into my Final Wish account and go through and update My Wishes. I find doing this very therapeutic and it gives me peace of mind when I travel. This time was different, as I was going through My Wishes I realized I still have Dooby listed as my pet and have my friend Tannis assigned to care for him in case something happens to my wife and myself.

For some reason it was very difficult for me to delete this information. I know he is gone, but deleting his name just re-in forced this fact. I will never forget Dooby and he will always have a place in my heart. RIP little buddy.

Our pets truly are our family and when they are gone a part of us is gone. Most people outlive their pets, but some do not and that is why it is so important to have a plan in place in case something happens to you. It was one of the main reasons I created Final Wish and why I made this part of the service absolutely FREE.

Thank you for reading my post. 

Sincerely, Andrew Smith of Final Wish Inc.


Final Wish
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Control your Facebook account from the afterlife with Final Wish!
Final Wish Was Featured Again In The Globe And Mail! So Thankful For Their Support!
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Control your Facebook account from the afterlife, and other services

Given the amount of time that many of us devote to our Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts, managing what other people know about our lives has become a full-time job for some.

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Jan 26, 2017 06:27 (GMT)
Final Wish
@FinalWish
FinalWish
Great Information From @legalzoom On What Happens To Your Pet When You Pass Away.

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2017-01-13 02:42:22

What happens to my pets when I pass away?

In the eyes of the law, pets are treated the same way as property. Therefore, the judge or the executor of your estate must often make the critical decisions as to who will take care of your pets. But probate can take months, even years.

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Jan 13, 2017 10:50 (GMT)
Final Wish
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Muhammad Ali's Book of Final Wishes

By Dave Saba Of Final Wish Inc.

Muhammad Ali was just one of many notable deaths in 2016. At one time Ali was the most recognizable face on the planet. Charismatic, handsome, whip-smart, and doggedly perseverant, the three time World Heavyweight Champion fought some of the greatest boxing matches of all time. With a lifetime record of 100-5 he captivated audiences equally with his trash-talking and showboating, as well as his ability to take and dish brutal punishment in the ring. It’s inconsequential that many historians argue that Ali wasn’t the greatest boxer of all time. As Noble-laureate Bob Dylan wrote in his eulogy for Mohammad Ali:

“If the measure of greatness is to gladden the heart of every human being on the face of the earth, then he truly was the greatest. In every way he was the bravest, the kindest and the most excellent of men.”

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2016-12-15 02:56:17
Muhammad Ali used his platform as a world champion boxer to fight for Black empowerment, promote peace, and inspire the oppressed. He refused to be humble or tow any line. A convert to Islam, he refused to be inducted into the US military. Voicing his strong opposition to the Vietnam War he risked his freedom and was unable to box professionally for almost four years. He brought the world’s attention to Zaire, Malaysia, and the Philippines, and engaged in charitable work at home and abroad. In 1990 he travelled to Iraq and successfully negotiated with Saddam Hussein for the release of 15 American civilians. And in 1994 after suffering from Parkinson’s disease for 12 years, with great difficulty and dignity Ali lit the Olympic torch in Atlanta, and in so doing inspired millions of new fans.

Muhammad Ali had no illusions that one day he would lose his battle against Parkinson’s. To try and ensure that his death would be celebrated in a way befitting his values, he began recording his final wishes. Those wishes that started as a simple document, reportedly grew to a volume two inches thick. It became known by his inner circle as “The Book”. Ali made revisions to The Book right until the last week of his life.

The comprehensive final wishes, that The Champ himself arranged, included his funerals, his memorial, and his burial. Ali detailed who he wanted in attendance and who he wanted as pallbearers. He let it be known where the funeral procession should be, and who should speak at the services. Ali understood his significance. He knew that dignitaries and celebrities, as well as normal folk would want to pay their respects to him. He may have also worried that his funeral could be co-opted by some to the detriment of others. It was important for Muhammad Ali that his funeral be open to everybody, celebratory of his proud legacy, while humble to his faith. Not an easy task.

In the end Muhammad Ali had a Jenazah - a traditional Muslim funeral - at the hall where he won his first professional fight in 1960. It was not exclusive and anyone could attend. The following day he had a memorial service in the largest arena in Louisville. Ali chose representatives that he respected from Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Judaism, and Mormonism. One representative chosen by Ali was Rabbi Michael Lerner. He was an ally who spoke out against the Vietnam War with Ali in the 1960s. Bill Clinton delivered a eulogy. Pallbearers included Ali’s close friends and family members, as well as Mike Tyson, Will Smith, and Lennox Lewis. A 19 mile-long procession carried Ali's body by his favourite places in Louisville: his childhood home and the streets where he played, the gym where he learned to fight, his museum, as well as the street that now bears his name.

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2016-12-15 02:50:15

Ali was buried in Cave Hill Cemetery in a site he chose personally. There’s a flower patch nearby, and he rests across from a lake with a gently rippling fountain. A modest marker in keeping with his Islamic faith is inscribed with one word: Ali.

Click HERE For More Information On Final Wish.

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William Shakespeare’s Final Wishes

“Blessed be the man that spares these stones, And cursed be he that moves my bones.”

Was Shakespeare's gravestone epitaph a curse? Did it work, or did the church move his bones?

“Item, I give unto my wife my second best bed with the furniture.”

Did Shakespeare want everyone to know that his wife was second best? Or was this bed a romantic gift?

Scroll to learn more about Shakespeare's Final Wishes...

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2016-11-18 02:04:00

By Dave Saba Of Final Wish Inc.

William Shakespeare is probably the greatest and most mystery-shrouded writer in the English language. But for someone so celebrated, very little is known about him and his personal life.

Some people portray him as a loving husband and father, who left his humble upbringings in a rural town to become the Bard of Avon, granted a coat of arms and the title of ‘gentleman’. They say that the son of a leatherworker who became the municipal ale taster lived his final years in retirement, happily accompanied by his wife Anne Hathaway and their daughters.

Others suggest Shakespeare’s marriage was loveless, and more of the shotgun variety. He was 18, she was 26 and three months pregnant. Was he happily married when he wrote a series of sonnets, including one that is particularly bawdy, celebrating his “Dark Lady” mistress, who was dun-coloured with raven black eyes and hair?

To some he was the Eminem of his day, not only a writer, but a successful actor and theatre owner, who challenged the aristocracy and bragged how his “powerful rhyme” would outlast death. The South African Journal of Science published a report that pipe fragments from Shakespeare’s garden tested positive for cannabis. Some historians argue that he couldn’t possibly have written all the works attributed to him. And one historian has gone so far as to state that Shakespeare wasn’t English at all but Italian.

Unfortunately for those curious of who Shakespeare the man was, at that time an unrecorded life was the norm, and his was no different.

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2016-11-18 02:05:56

Death was a central theme in many of Shakespeare’s plays and poems, from funeral processions to lovers dying of ritualistic suicide in a crypt, not to mention a certain soliloquy performed with a skull in hand. This shouldn’t be surprising. The London Shakespeare lived in would be unrecognizable to us. Public executions were common, and the heads of traitors, often par-boiled and dipped in tar, were displayed and maintained on the gates of London Bridge. Crippling poverty was apparent everywhere, and frequent outbreaks of bubonic plague, as well as smallpox, syphilis, and tuberculosis helped to reduce the average life expectancy to thirty-five years.

We know that Shakespeare lived to the ripe-old age of 52, but how he died is disputed. There are records of a virulent outbreak of the “new fever”, typhus, in his area the year he died. Yet the vicar of the church where Shakespeare is buried wrote that he died after a merry meeting and hard night of drinking. A biography of Shakespeare’s son-in-law, who was a doctor, claims he had a stroke. There is no surviving record of Shakespeare’s funeral and who attended. Thankfully though, Shakespeare recorded many of his final wishes and even wrote his own epitaph.

The last two lines of his epitaph read “Blessed be the man that spares these stones, And cursed be he that moves my bones.”  Apparently Shakespeare was appalled by how bodies were treated after death. He had been privy to a room in his church that was full of exhumed bones awaiting reburial, and as a result he wanted to ensure that his remains were left in peace. He was buried as he wanted, in the Church of the Holy Trinity in Stratford-upon-Avon, but as a lay rector buried in the chancel (prime real estate near the altar) he knew there was a fair chance that his remains would be exhumed in favour of someone with deeper ties to the church. Hence the curse. Shakespeare’s curse worked as he was never officially exhumed. The scary epitaph also allowed for Anne Hathaway, who died seven years later, to be buried beside him. Apparently workers were too afraid to disrupt his bones by burying them together.

Shakespeare’s will detailed many of his final wishes and it provided insight into who and what he cared about. Almost half the will concerns his daughter Judith. She’d had a rough go being excommunicated for an unofficial wedding – her husband had not secured the right license – and then having to deal with the disgrace brought on by his adultery and conviction for “carnal copulation”. Shakespeare ensured that she was well taken care of financially, and that she received his “broad silver gilt bowl”. He left the son of his deceased friend, who had been a local MP, his sword. Shakespeare also left some money for the poor of Stratford, and ensured that enough was left over for his mates and godson to have mourning rings.

There is one of Shakespeare’s final wishes in particular that keeps historians questioning the happiness of his marriage, and it concerns the “second best bed”. In his will the second best bed is all that Shakespeare left his wife. “Item, I give unto my wife my second best bed with the furniture.” Some argue that this is the proof that the marriage was loveless, or that Shakespeare was cruel to Anne Hathaway. Others disagree, saying that she must have already been provided for outside of the will, although there is no reference to this. Some of his romantic fans argue that this was a loving and sentimental gesture. Apparently the best bed in a house back then would have been a guest bed, and the second best bed would be the matrimonial bed. Theories abound. And while it’s doubtful that we will ever know the truth about much of Shakespeare’s personal life, there is no doubt that thanks to his final wishes and epitaph, we know more than we would have.  And what we do know certainly provides fodder for lots of interesting discussion.

Click HERE For More Information On Final Wish.

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